Illustration: Marco Melgrati

Progress and its discontents

The world has never been better. From global poverty to inequality between nations, all the indicators are showing progress. This is a comforting narrative – popularized by the likes of Bill Gates and Steven Pinker. But is it true? Jason Hickel examines the rise of this so-called ‘New Optimism’, with its ‘battle cry for the status quo’.

Buy this magazine

NI 520 - The right to the city - July, 2019
Photo: Chokniti Khongchum/Alamy

Protecting the ‘lungs of West Africa’

Veronique Mistiaen speaks to environmental lawyer Alfred Brownell about the grave threat palm-oil corporations pose to the people of Sinoe County, Liberia, and the rich rainforests they depend upon.

Buy this magazine

NI 520 - The right to the city - July, 2019
Husna during training with her kickboxing instructor who comes from Dohuk, the nearest city to the camp.Photo: Giacomo Sini

Packing a punch

In the refugee camps of Iraqi Kurdistan, Yazidi women are using boxing to overcome the traumas of war. Report by Monir Ghaedi, photos by Giacomo Sini.

Buy this magazine

NI 520 - The right to the city - July, 2019
Photo: Prince Akachi

Vanishing point

The city can provide cover and anonymity to those who seek it, explains David Nnanna Ikpo.

Buy this magazine

NI 520 - The right to the city - July, 2019
Left out of the big bash: children from Mangueira favela watch fireworks over Maracana Stadium during the closing ceremony.Photo: CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images

Spectacle and reality in Rio

Anne-Marie Broudehoux punctures the bombastic narrative of civic pride and prosperity that accompanies sporting mega-events to reveal how they actually remake the city upon the backs of the poor.

Buy this magazine

NI 520 - The right to the city - July, 2019
Photo: Roberto Ourgant

Grand designs

Architecture is never neutral, explains Laith Kharus Whitwham. But can it be made to truly serve the public?

Buy this magazine

NI 520 - The right to the city - July, 2019
Night falls on Ranchi’s dreamers.Photo: Arun Dahiya/EyeEm/Getty

Small city, big dreams

India’s rapidly expanding cities attract young dreamers like magnets. Snigdha Poonam observes how the horizon of promise keeps receding in Ranchi.

Buy this magazine

NI 520 - The right to the city - July, 2019

The price is not right

The mushrooming trend of cashing in on fast returns from housing is devastating working people’s lives in cities across the world. UN expert Leilani Farha lays it on the line. Interview by Dinyar Godrej.

Buy this magazine

NI 520 - The right to the city - July, 2019

Cities - The Facts

Density, location, economics, sustainability and inequality.

Buy this magazine

NI 520 - The right to the city - July, 2019
Mean streets: taxi driver Mohammed Khan works a 12 hour day, six days a week in New York City just to make ends meet.Photo: ESPEN RASMUSSEN/PANOS PICTURES

Whose city?

If the future of humanity lies in cities, says Dinyar Godrej, then it follows that inhabitants of every strata must have a right to it.

Buy this magazine

NI 520 - The right to the city - July, 2019
The Sateré-Mawé people of Brazil are preparing to retake their land.Photo: Raphael Alves/AFP/Getty

Bullet ants and stolen land

Jair Bolsonaro may be in power, but the Sateré indigenous people are not taking his hostility sitting down. Sue Branford reports from the Brazilian Amazon.

Buy this magazine

NI 519 - How to avoid climate breakdown - May, 2019
Armed enforcers: members of the Cameroonian national police force patrol a square in the majority anglophone southwest province capital Buea during a political rally of President Paul Biya’s ruling CPDM party. Photo: Marco Longari/AFP/Getty

‘Licence to kill’

In Cameroon, civil war is brewing along linguistic lines. Its origins lie in the botched decolonization of the country’s anglophone territory, but President Paul Biya’s repressive regime has poured fuel on the fire. Lorraine Mallinder reports.

Buy this magazine

NI 519 - How to avoid climate breakdown - May, 2019
Images from the women's gathering in Chotacaj. Mayan spirituality plays an important part in indigenous feminism, but the issues dealt with are tough - racism, violence and abuse, unequal rights. Photo: James Rodriguez/Panos

From a place of healing

Indigenous feminists in Guatemala encourage women to speak out against male violence, and to heal and defend themselves as they defend their ancestral territory. Frauke Decoodt listens to their stories of resistance.

Buy this magazine

NI 519 - How to avoid climate breakdown - May, 2019
Members of the South African National Youth Orchestra walk on a beach in Cape Town after a performance. Zinhle Mfaba and Nina Cilliers became friends through playing in the orchestra. ‘When we’re playing together, we’re in sync – we’re there for a common cause. That brings us together and makes us one,’ says Mfaba.Photo: Ilvy Njiokiktjien

South Africa’s born-frees

This year, South Africa marks 25 years since its first democratic elections, which ended white minority rule, made Nelson Mandela president and gave all South Africans equal political rights. Ilvy Njiokiktjien photographs the young South Africans who have known only life in the post-apartheid ‘rainbow nation’.

Buy this magazine

NI 519 - How to avoid climate breakdown - May, 2019
Gary Bentley was laid off after 12 years working down the mines in Letcher County, Kentucky.Photo: Lance booth

Life after coal

Can we move away from fossil fuels without destroying the communities that rely on them? Sam Adler Bell looks to the devastated US coalfields of Appalachia.

Buy this magazine

NI 519 - How to avoid climate breakdown - May, 2019
Photo: Johannes Plenio on Unsplash

First-class lifeboats

The super-rich are preparing for doomsday. Only problem is, the rest of us aren’t invited. Tom Whyman explains.

Buy this magazine

NI 519 - How to avoid climate breakdown - May, 2019

Footsteps disappear

Lifestyle changes are no substitute for collective action. But personal carbon-cutting still matters – it’s a powerful way to signal the climate emergency to those around us, move the needle on policy and set bigger cultural changes in motion. Mike Berners-Lee lays out an nine-step carbon detox.

Buy this magazine

NI 519 - How to avoid climate breakdown - May, 2019

World in motion

In order to limit global temperature rise to 1.5°C, over 80 per cent of known fossil-fuel reserves simply cannot be burned. As political systems fail, Danny Chivers writes about the social movements are targeting mines, rigs, infra­structure and investment to keep carbon in the ground. Illustrations: Jason Ngai.

Buy this magazine

NI 519 - How to avoid climate breakdown - May, 2019
Illustration: Nadia Akingbule

‘Real education happens outside the classroom’

Pacific Climate Warrior Brianna Fruean and Anna Taylor of UK school strikes movement talk what inspires them and how to avoid activist burnout. Conversation moderated by Hazel Healy.

Buy this magazine

NI 519 - How to avoid climate breakdown - May, 2019
How do we get to zero-carbon emissions?

How do we get to zero-carbon emissions?

Current emissions; Halving by 2030; Policies to zero by 2050.

Buy this magazine

NI 519 - How to avoid climate breakdown - May, 2019

Action & info

Climate science; Transition policy; Action; Listen.

Buy this magazine

NI 519 - How to avoid climate breakdown - May, 2019
There’s still time to mitigate the worst effects of climate change. Can we pull it off?Photo: Sandra Kaas/Unsplash

Habitable Earth

There’s still time to mitigate the worst effects of climate change. Can we pull it off? Hazel Healy makes the case for conditional optimism.

Buy this magazine

NI 519 - How to avoid climate breakdown - May, 2019

Enter: the new daughters of Africa

With the release of New Daughters of Africa, editor Margaret Busby explains why the collection – 25 years after Daughters of Africa was published – could not have come at a better time and introduces three stories from the anthology.

Buy this magazine

NI 518 - Building a new internationalism - March, 2019
Rescued but fearful: these are images of sub-Saharan women brought ashore from the Alboran Sea to the port of Motril near Granada by maritime rescue teams. Whether draped in red blankets or clinging fast to a railing after their time on the waves, uncertainty is written on every face.Photo: CARLOS GILL / SOPA IMAGES / GETTY

For women seeking refuge in Spain, a trail of peril awaits

The stories of women migrants making the desperate Mediterranean crossing to Europe are different from those of the men, marked by a higher level of exploitation and abuse. Lucia Benavides reports from Spain.

Buy this magazine

NI 518 - Building a new internationalism - March, 2019

Articles in this category displayed as a table:

Article title From magazine Publication date
The right to the city July, 2019
The right to the city July, 2019
The right to the city July, 2019
The right to the city July, 2019
The right to the city July, 2019
The right to the city July, 2019
The right to the city July, 2019
The right to the city July, 2019
The right to the city July, 2019
The right to the city July, 2019
How to avoid climate breakdown May, 2019
How to avoid climate breakdown May, 2019
How to avoid climate breakdown May, 2019
How to avoid climate breakdown May, 2019
How to avoid climate breakdown May, 2019
How to avoid climate breakdown May, 2019
How to avoid climate breakdown May, 2019
How to avoid climate breakdown May, 2019
How to avoid climate breakdown May, 2019
How to avoid climate breakdown May, 2019
How to avoid climate breakdown May, 2019
How to avoid climate breakdown May, 2019
Building a new internationalism March, 2019
Building a new internationalism March, 2019
Back