Illustration: Nadia Akingbule

‘I didn’t want to be a mother’

In a groundbreaking new work, Trifonia Melibea Obono has sought out and recorded the unheard stories of lesbian and bisexual women living in the small West African state of Equatorial Guinea.

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NI 522 - China in charge - November, 2019

No room for dissent

With a year to go until Myanmar’s next general election, political activism is being pushed to the periphery. Charlotte England reports.

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NI 522 - China in charge - November, 2019
Bulu Bari is a regular at the Bangladesh Film Development Corporation complex – but work is scarce.

Dhallywood dreams

Under a tree in the studios of Bangladesh’s struggling film industry, women extras in the shadows of glamour wait for work. They tell Sophie Hemery and Alice McCool their stories.

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NI 522 - China in charge - November, 2019
Looking the very picture of a traditional way of life, mathematics teacher Phunchok Angmo, photographed at Thiksey monastery, near Leh, Ladakh, is observing startling changes among her pupils. ‘The children here no longer care about the culture and they spend less time talking to each other,’ she says. ‘They spend their free time on laptops.’Photo: Cathal McNaughton/Reuters

Globalization and extremism – join the dots

Insecure people can be highly susceptible to false narratives purporting to explain their precarious situation​, argues Helena Norberg-Hodge.

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NI 522 - China in charge - November, 2019
A still from the music video for ‘Room Service’, via the record label 88rising, by hip-hop sensation Higher Brothers.nin.tl/higherbrothers

(Don’t) fight the power

Amy Hawkins surveys the cultural landscape in the world’s second-largest economy.

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NI 522 - China in charge - November, 2019
(Previous page) A guard at the Mombasa terminus of the Chinese-financed SGR railway. Saturday is one of the busiest times on the line, as Kenyans travel from Nairobi to the coast to visit family.Photo: Luis Tato/Bloomberg/Getty

The Beijing connection

China is Africa’s largest trading partner and has become deeply involved with the continent’s politics in recent years. This has not been without its controversies. Christine Mungai reflects on the past, present and future of the relationship between these two powerhouses.

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NI 522 - China in charge - November, 2019
Uyghur men in Xinjiang pray during the Corban festival (Eid) in 2016. Public displays of religiosity are now considered signs of extremism.Photo: Kevin Frayer/Getty

Living in a ghost world

Since 2016, at least a million people have been sent to re-education camps as part of the Chinese government’s persecution of the Uyghur people. Yohann Koshy speaks to anthropologist Darren Byler to find out what is going on in China’s northwest province.

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NI 522 - China in charge - November, 2019
A fisher catches crayfish near a canopy of solar panels in Yangzhou. China has quickly become the world’s poster-child for renewables.Photo: Meng Delong/Getty

How green is china?

Ma Tianjie examines the limits of China’s ‘ecological nationalism’.

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NI 522 - China in charge - November, 2019
China - The Facts

China - The Facts

Where’s the money going?; More money, more problems; Climate breakdown; In focus.

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NI 522 - China in charge - November, 2019

Take action

Campaigning and more reading on China.

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NI 522 - China in charge - November, 2019
Since the 2008 economic crisis, China has invested heavily in infrastructure. The largest radio telescope in the world, for observing outer space, was completed in 2016 in southwest China.Photo: Liu Xu/Xinhua/Alamy

China in charge

From a poor agricultural nation to the second-largest economy in the world: the rapid rise of China is one of the most remarkable facts of this era, as Yohann Koshy finds out. But how did it happen? And what comes next?

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NI 522 - China in charge - November, 2019
Empire Day around 1950 – a flagwaving, monocultural past for which too many Britons currently feel nostalgic.Photo: Hulton Archive/Getty

‘Call yourself english?’

Blake Morrison grew up in Yorkshire – and made his escape from his traditional conservative background via literature. As he discovered writers from other cultures, borders between cultures and nations seemed to fall away, leaving him as a citizen of the world. But since the Brexit referendum he has often felt like a stranger in his own country.

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NI 521 - Who owns the sea? - September, 2019
A Filipino worker in a Lebanese household shows a picture of her daughter, whom she hasn't seen in years.Photo: Matthew Cassel

No place to hide

Will shaming employers on social media finally bring justice for Lebanon’s domestic workers? Roshan De Stone and David Suber report from Beirut.

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NI 521 - Who owns the sea? - September, 2019
Illustration: Peter Reynolds

What we cannot avoid

Jeremy Seabrook surveys a political landscape riven with virulent nostalgias which obscure an essential conflict – how to reconcile the needs of the planet with the necessities of economics?

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NI 521 - Who owns the sea? - September, 2019

What can I do?

Personal efforts are definitely worthwhile, but the scale of the problem requires action at a national and international political level, too.

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NI 521 - Who owns the sea? - September, 2019
Burmese worker Ko Htay complained of long working hours and lack of food on a Thai trawler. Workers report 20-hour shifts; some are given amphetamines to keep them going.Photo: Photograph © EJF

High seas, low deeds

Human rights at sea by Vanessa Baird.

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NI 521 - Who owns the sea? - September, 2019
Chinese People’s Republic soldiers patrol the Paracel Islands, also claimed by Vietnam and Taiwan. The US asserts its military dominance via naval patrols and bases in the region.Photo: Stringer/Reuters

Who is militarizing the South China Sea?

This area is a simmering cauldron for conflict between China and its neighbours – and the US. Mark J Valencia makes sense of the situation.

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NI 521 - Who owns the sea? - September, 2019
Oceania

Oceania

For Epeli Hau’ofa, by Karlo Mila.

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NI 521 - Who owns the sea? - September, 2019
Genetically rich crabs at the Center for Marine Biotechnology in Baltimore.Photo: Cavan/Alamy

Marine gene rush

The race is on to patent all marine life – and some have got a head start. Marine scientist Robert Blasiak explains to Vanessa Baird what it means.

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NI 521 - Who owns the sea? - September, 2019
A Liberian soldier, on joint patrol with Sea Shepherd, about to board an illegal shrimper.Photo: Sea Shepherd global

How to fight illegal fishing

Can fishers, coastguards and marine activists see off the thieves from powerful nations plundering the seas of West Africa? Aïda Grovestins reports.

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NI 521 - Who owns the sea? - September, 2019

Articles in this category displayed as a table:

Article title From magazine Publication date
China in charge November, 2019
China in charge November, 2019
China in charge November, 2019
China in charge November, 2019
China in charge November, 2019
China in charge November, 2019
China in charge November, 2019
China in charge November, 2019
China in charge November, 2019
China in charge November, 2019
China in charge November, 2019
Who owns the sea? September, 2019
Who owns the sea? September, 2019
Who owns the sea? September, 2019
Who owns the sea? September, 2019
Who owns the sea? September, 2019
Who owns the sea? September, 2019
Who owns the sea? September, 2019
Who owns the sea? September, 2019
Who owns the sea? September, 2019
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