Between the devil and the deep blue sea

In 1987, the British government contracted a passenger ferry to act as a floating immigration detention centre for Tamil refugees. Later that year a storm set the ship loose from its moorings. Felix Bazalgette reports on the the little-known story of exodus and empire that paved the way for the Windrush scandal.

Buy this magazine

NI 516 - The dirt on waste - November, 2018

Keeping women in their place

As 25 November marks the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women, Joni Seager maps the stark reality faced by women in every corner of the world – from Belarus to Brazil.

Buy this magazine

NI 516 - The dirt on waste - November, 2018

The personality crisis

As growth-driven consumer culture spurs on planetary destruction, why don’t we spring into action? Psychologist John F Schumaker situates a frightening erosion of human personality at the heart of the problem.

Buy this magazine

NI 516 - The dirt on waste - November, 2018
Illustration: Olivier Kugler

Written in stone

An indigenous movement in Jharkhand is reminding the Indian authorities of their constitutional duty to protect tribal lands. But the government is persecuting tribespeople for standing up. Rohini Mohan reports.

Buy this magazine

NI 516 - The dirt on waste - November, 2018
Left: Rumani, a Coptic Zabaleen, pulls his cart full of garbage outside his home in Manshiyat Naser (or Garbage City) in Cairo.Photo: Marco Bulgarelli/Gamma-Rapho via Getty

Pick of the heap

Attempts to solve Cairo’s garbage problems come up against a community whose livelihoods depend on refuse. Hisham Allam reports.

Buy this magazine

NI 516 - The dirt on waste - November, 2018
A river of bin bags snakes down the road  in Jdeideh, Beirut, at the height of the rubbish crisis in February 2016.Photo: Hasan Shaaban/Reuters

Fighting the big burn

The mismanagement of Lebanon’s trash has brought citizens onto the streets – and the latest plans are also stoking outrage. But, as Fiona Broom discovers, there are also optimists.

Buy this magazine

NI 516 - The dirt on waste - November, 2018
Unsaleable fruit at the wholesale food market of Rungis, Paris, gets sorted so that what is still usable can go to food banks.Photo: Martin BUREAU/AFP/Getty

When it is illegal to waste food

By supermarkets, that is. Timothy Baster and Isabelle Merminod on the progress of a much-lauded French law.

Buy this magazine

NI 516 - The dirt on waste - November, 2018
A young girl stands defiantly amid the Agbogbloshie dump’s burning fields near Accra – clouds of toxic smoke rising behind her. From dusk until dawn, workers – usually young, male migrants from Ghana’s northern Tamale region – burn automobile parts and electronic waste in order to reveal their copper components in exchange for money for food. According to the Seattle-based NGO, Basel Action Network, millions of tonnes of e-waste from industrialized nations are ‘processed’ at Agbogbloshie each year.Photo: Benjamin Lowy/Getty

Dirty work

Around the world, 15 million people – including children – have little choice but to earn a living from the waste polluting their surroundings. They often work in dangerous conditions, risking their health, sometimes their lives; and are usually relegated to the bottom of the social pecking order, struggling to improve their working conditions.

Buy this magazine

NI 516 - The dirt on waste - November, 2018
the packaging industry is not taking responsibility waste is not just an issue for the individual

It’s all down to you

Dinyar Godrej explains why the packing industry loves shunting the blame on individual consumers.

Buy this magazine

NI 516 - The dirt on waste - November, 2018
The face of plastic recycling that China wants to change. A worker sorts plastic in Dong Xiao Kou, a 'scrap village' on the outskirts of Beijing where poor migrant families survive from recycling rubbish.Photo: Kevin Frayer/Getty

No more of your junk

Last year, China announced a ban on imports of ‘foreign garbage’. The result? Western stockpiles of used paper and plastic have reached crisis proportions. Adam Liebman on why we need a less rosy notion of what actually happens to our recycling.

Buy this magazine

NI 516 - The dirt on waste - November, 2018
Waste - The Facts

Waste - The Facts

How much; disposal; food; plastic; electronic waste; the facts and figures.

Buy this magazine

NI 516 - The dirt on waste - November, 2018
Like a scene from a blockbuster epic on trash: people search for pickings in the Indonesian capital Jakarta's Bantar Gebang dump. Over 60 per cent of the waste is organic and could be composted, but there is no large-scale sorting of refuse, making it much harder to manage.Photo: Bay Ismoyo/AFP/Getty

Modern life is rubbish

The dirt on waste. Dinyar Godrej argues that the problems with our throwaway society add up to much more than the sum of individual actions.

Buy this magazine

NI 516 - The dirt on waste - November, 2018
Illustrations: Emma Peer

The merit trap

Politicians of both Left and Right continue to march behind the banners of meritocracy and equality of opportunity as if this were all that is needed to achieve a fair society. But rewarding people for their ‘merit’ may be creating a new class system based on arrogant, insensitive winners and angry, desperate losers, writes Peter Adamson.

Read this article

NI 515 - Making peace in a world at war - September, 2018
A Palestinian woman crosses ‘Checkpoint 300’ with her child. She is one of the few women making the morning crossing from Bethlehem to Israel – those who do, often sell vegetables and herbs in the old city of Jerusalem. Women, students and those seeking medical care in Israel or East Jerusalem should pass through a distinct ‘humanitarian lane’ but it is often closed, leaving them no choice but to use the crowded male workers’ line.Photo: Anne Paq / Active Stills

‘This is not a life’

Some 70,000 Palestinian workers pass through Israeli checkpoints every day. The process, which can take several hours, is disorganized and conditions overcrowded. Those without proper permits often attempt the crossing via gaps in the Israeli wall and mountain routes along the Green Line and run the risk of being arrested or even shot at by Israeli forces. Words & photography by Anne Paq / Active Stills

Buy this magazine

NI 515 - Making peace in a world at war - September, 2018

Our bodies, our rights

According to the UN, most surgeries on intersex babies amount to torture. And yet that is the practice in almost every country in the world today. Valentino Vecchietti calls for urgent change.

Read this article

NI 515 - Making peace in a world at war - September, 2018

What rape tells us about society

The brutal gang rape and murder of Jyoti Singh in 2012 shone a blistering light on sexual violence as a staggeringly common occurrence in India. Author Sohaila Abdulali explains how, despite the case’s global coverage, the conversation about rape has only just begun.

Buy this magazine

NI 515 - Making peace in a world at war - September, 2018
Illustration: Saman Sarheng

Diplomats – who needs them?

Frances Guy makes a plea for traditional diplomacy in the age of the Trumpian tweet.

Buy this magazine

NI 515 - Making peace in a world at war - September, 2018
Illustration: Serhii Paranchuk / ALAMY   Words: Yohann Koshy

Inside the mind of the mediator

After 20 years of brutal civil war, the rulers of Arcadia and the rebels are ready to consider laying down arms. The mediation team needs a leader and – for some reason – your name is chosen. Do you have what it takes? Take our quiz to find out...

Read this article

NI 515 - Making peace in a world at war - September, 2018
‘We can’t stop now’

‘We can’t stop now’

Unusually, victims testified directly at the Havana peace talks between FARC guerrillas and the government. Maria Eugenia Cruz Alarcón, one of the first to bear witness, explains why she will defend Colombia’s peace agreement – at all costs.

Buy this magazine

NI 515 - Making peace in a world at war - September, 2018
The funeral in April 2017 of indigenous leader Gerson Acosta, among the hundreds killed since the peace deal of 2016.Photo: Mads Nissen / Panos

The slow and bloody road to justice

Colombia’s peace deal promised the return of stolen lands. But it isn’t so easy to achieve, Mira Galanova discovers.

Buy this magazine

NI 515 - Making peace in a world at war - September, 2018
War Machine - The Facts

War Machine - The Facts

The arms trade is a powerful and enduring obstacle to peace.

Buy this magazine

NI 515 - Making peace in a world at war - September, 2018

Articles in this category displayed as a table:

Article title From magazine Publication date
The dirt on waste November, 2018
The dirt on waste November, 2018
The dirt on waste November, 2018
The dirt on waste November, 2018
The dirt on waste November, 2018
The dirt on waste November, 2018
The dirt on waste November, 2018
The dirt on waste November, 2018
The dirt on waste November, 2018
The dirt on waste November, 2018
The dirt on waste November, 2018
The dirt on waste November, 2018
The dirt on waste November, 2018
The dirt on waste November, 2018
Making peace in a world at war September, 2018
Making peace in a world at war September, 2018
Making peace in a world at war September, 2018
Making peace in a world at war September, 2018
Making peace in a world at war September, 2018
Making peace in a world at war September, 2018
Making peace in a world at war September, 2018
Making peace in a world at war September, 2018
Making peace in a world at war September, 2018
Making peace in a world at war September, 2018
Back