This month's big story

The disappearing Senegalese sardines

Why is a nutritious superfood being routed away from poor communities to feed salmon, pigs and pets? Hazel Healy investigates.

Sunday is a working day like any other in Thiaroye-sur-Mer, a fishing village long since swallowed up by the urban sprawl of Dakar. The tarmac road down to the seafr...

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A note from the editor

Hazel Healy

Hazel Healy

How not to feed the world

Imagine you live by the Atlantic Ocean, close enough to hear the waves breaking. In those waters swim small fish. They are a superfood: rich in the nutrients needed by your bodies – and those of your children.
But these fish are destined for the diets of others. They will be turned into food for farmed fis...

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Magazine archive

Here are the most recent magazines we've published.

NI 533 - Food justice: who gets to eat? - September, 2021 Food justice: who gets to eat? Hazel Healy 1 September 2021 NI 532 - Courage and terror in Myanmar - July, 2021 Courage and terror in Myanmar Preeti Jha 1 July 2021 NI 531 - Vaccine equality - May, 2021 Vaccine equality Editorial Team 1 May 2021

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NI 508 - Clampdown! Criminalizing dissent - December, 2017 Clampdown! Criminalizing dissent Richard Swift 1 December 2017

Recent feature articles

A selection of feature articles from each of the latest New Internationalist magazines.

 Another chunk of the Amazon rainforest goes up in smoke. In the last 10 years alone, 38,600 km2 (equal to 8.4 million football fields) has been deforested for ranching, logging, soy and oil-palm cultivation. Photo: Loren McIntyre/Stock Connection Blue/Alamy

The case for nature

We have brought the natural world and its diversity to a breaking point. Dinyar Godrej surveys the damage and explores how we need to act to repair it.

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Europe-bound. Migrant travellers from Togo en route to Italy after being rescued by Spanish rescue NGO Open Arms, February 2017. Photo: David Ramos/Getty

The right to move

People have always moved and cultures have always mingled. So why the myopic obsession with borders, asks Hazel Healy.

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Since the 2008 economic crisis, China has invested heavily in infrastructure. The largest radio telescope in the world, for observing outer space, was completed in 2016 in southwest China. Photo: Liu Xu/Xinhua/Alamy

China in charge

From a poor agricultural nation to the second-largest economy in the world: the rapid rise of China is one of the most remarkable facts of this era, as Yohann Koshy finds out. But how did it happen? And what comes next?

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 Illustration: Steve Munday

Is trade in turmoil a chance for justice?

The global free trade system is being battered like never before. Can any good come of it, asks Vanessa Baird in the first of an eight-article exploration?

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Like a scene from a blockbuster epic on trash: people search for pickings in the Indonesian capital Jakarta's Bantar Gebang dump. Over 60 per cent of the waste is organic and could be composted, but there is no large-scale sorting of refuse, making it much harder to manage. Photo: Bay Ismoyo/AFP/Getty

Modern life is rubbish

The dirt on waste. Dinyar Godrej argues that the problems with our throwaway society add up to much more than the sum of individual actions.

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Fighting for their livelihoods: Puerto Rican teachers come out against the government’s drive to privatize public education. Photo: Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images

The case for public ownership

After decades of denuding privatization policies, the green shoots of a public takeback are finally appearing. Dinyar Godrej on the promise and the threat.

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From the archives

A selection of articles from the New Internationalist magazine archives.

Reasons to be cheerful

Reasons to be cheerful

Army of Robins; Fossil fail; Mothers halt HIV

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Mixed Media: Film

Mixed Media: Film

Luxor directed and written by Zeina Durra; Shirley directed by Josephine Decker.

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Mixed Media: Books

Mixed Media: Books

Chronicles from the Land of the Happiest People on Earth by Wole Soyinka; Little Brother by Ibrahima Balde and Amets Arzallus Antia, translated by Timberlake Wertenbaker; World Politics since 1989 by Jonathan Holslag; Patriarchy of the Wage by Sylvia Federici.

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Mixed Media: Music

Drawing Life by Jocelyn Pook; K(no)w Them, K(no)w Us by Xhosa Cole.

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 Illustration: Sarah John

The city inside you

Letter from Johannesburg. Yewande Omotoso ponders how belonging to a city goes beyond the bald fact of living in it.

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Anabela (right) provides shade during a participatory video session. Photo: Thor Morales via Insight Share

Making Waves: Anabela Carlón Flores

Nick Dowson speaks with an indigenous lawyer and campaigner fighting a gas pipeline in Mexico.

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The dictator and his public: Kim Jong-un does the rounds. Photo: KCNA/Xinhua/Alamy Live News

Worldbeaters: The Kim Family

Kim Jong-un's headline grabbing aggressive irrationalism takes some beating (though he might have met his match in recent times...)

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Hunger - The Facts

Hunger - The Facts

Our dysfunctional food system was failing before Covid-19.

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Clockwise from top left: Two members of the Taz clan take part in a wrestling match at their annual two-day festival at Song Kol Lake, in Naryn Province, which also includes family storytelling, dancing and horse-riding games; a woman milks a mare in the Kyrgyz Alatau range (part of the Tien Shan mountains) – she will make a fermented drink called kunus from the milk; two girls by the roadside near Kazarman; beekeeper Victor inspects his 120 hives in Sary-Chelek, in the western province of Jalal-Abad. Photos: Tim Dirven/Panos

Country Profile: Kyrgyzstan

The photos, facts, and politics of Kyrgyzstan.

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 Illustration: P J Polyp

Big Bad World

Truth. Cartoon by P J Polyp.

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