Barefoot surgeons

In the absence of enough trained doctors, reliance on other, less-qualified, health workers is growing in the Global South. Physician Neil Singh’s exploration begins with a surprising personal encounter.

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NI 530 - Democracy on the edge - March, 2021
Elevating African cuisine. A selection of dishes cooked by pioneering Senegalese Chef Pierre Thiam.Photo: Sara Costa

Freedom food

Rebel chefs are on a mission to decolonize diets across sub-Saharan Africa. Kareem Arthur goes in search of new ingredients.

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NI 530 - Democracy on the edge - March, 2021

Action & info

The topic is vast, the aspects covered in this issue limited, but there are many ways to take action on democracy.

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NI 530 - Democracy on the edge - March, 2021
Citizens take part in the high-profile 2020 French climate assembly, whose proposals should help shape their country’s policies towards a zero-carbon future.Photo: Katrin Baumann

Defibrillating democracy

Rich Wilson and Claire Mellier explain how citizens’ assemblies have the potential to restart the beating heart of democracy.

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NI 530 - Democracy on the edge - March, 2021
Photo: Javier Rodriguez/Pixabay

How we are gulled

We must be able to see the secret, algorithmic methods of Google, Facebook and other digital titans if we are to tackle disinformation and toxic polarization, says propaganda expert Peter Pomerantsev.

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NI 530 - Democracy on the edge - March, 2021
Opposite page: Activists in New York City protest against the influence of ‘dark money’ from the billionaire Koch brothers on many areas of political decision-making, including healthcare.Photo: Erik McGregor/Sipa USA/PA Images

Dark money

Funds from hidden sources are warping democracy with increasing and devastating effect. Peter Geoghegan follows the money.

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NI 530 - Democracy on the edge - March, 2021
Photo: Metamorworks/Shutterstock

The space invaders

Our privacy and freedom of thought is routinely and pervasively breached by the masters of surveillance capitalism. What is this doing to us as humans and to our democratic choices in life? Psychoanalyst Adam Phillips talks to Vanessa Baird.

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NI 530 - Democracy on the edge - March, 2021
Hadiya, in the red dress, appears at the Supreme Court in New Delhi to defend her marriage to her Muslim husband Shafin in one of India’s alleged ‘love jihad’ cases.Photo: Vipin Kumar/Hindustan Times Via Getty

Love and other conspiracies

India is not short of divisive and harmful conspiracy theories. Now one, called ‘love jihad’, has been given legal teeth. Laxmi Murthy reports.

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NI 530 - Democracy on the edge - March, 2021

Information and democracy - The Facts

We make our political judgements based on the information we get – and the internet is brimming with it. That can be part of the problem...

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NI 530 - Democracy on the edge - March, 2021
A mural featuring a pro-Trump protester, self-styled QAnon ‘shaman’ Jacob Chansley, appeared in Tunbridge Wells, UK, a few days after the storming of the US Congress in Washington on 6 January.Photo: Karwai Tang/Wireimage/Getty

Democracy on the edge

More fragile than we thought, liberal democracy seems to be under attack from many sides. Are these death throes – or growing pains? Vanessa Baird explores.

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NI 530 - Democracy on the edge - March, 2021
Finntopia

Finntopia

Danny Dorling and Annika Koljonen explain how Finland has come to be so equal, peaceful and happy – and sketch out the lessons we might learn from its example.

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NI 529 - The biodiversity emergency - January, 2021
Wafa Ali Mustafa holds up a picture of her father during a demonstration on the International Day of the Disappeared, at Alexanderplatz, Berlin.Photo: Ahmad Kalaji

The search for Syria’s missing

The families of the disappeared are not giving up their search until they have answers. Jan-Peter Westad reports.

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NI 529 - The biodiversity emergency - January, 2021
An ingenious agroforestry farming system, which combines trees, shrubs and crops is practiced throughout Ethiopia’s lush southern highlands.Photo: Olivier Bourguet/Alamy

The sheltering forest

Tesfa-Alem Tekle travels to meet the Ethiopian farmers whose unique agroforestry system has kept hunger at bay for millennia.

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NI 529 - The biodiversity emergency - January, 2021
Industrializing pathogens? Cattle pictured in a feedlot in South Africa.Photo: Martin Harvey/Getty Images

Planet Farm

As industrial agriculture encroaches into the last wild places of the Earth, it’s unleashing dangerous pathogens. Time to heal the metabolic rift between ecology and economy, suggests Rob Wallace.

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NI 529 - The biodiversity emergency - January, 2021
From left to right: A conservationist demonstrates to a class of schoolchildren the whooping crane costume used to rear chicks; Bullseye harlequin poison dart frog from the rainforest of Colombia; Andatu, the first Sumatran rhinoceros born in captivity in Indonesia.Photos from left to right: Nature and Science/Alamy; Dirk Ercken/Alamy; Reynold Sumakyu/Alamy.

What it takes

Around the world thousands of conservation projects are trying to rescue wildlife species in peril, often against huge odds. Each of them will face unique challenges, as these brief case histories demonstrate. Words: Dinyar Godrej.

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NI 529 - The biodiversity emergency - January, 2021
Hindou Oumarou Ibrahim.

‘Indigenous people respect all species’

Hindou Oumarou Ibrahim is an environmental activist and member of Chad’s pastoralist Mbororo community who believes in twinning traditional knowledge with science to tackle ecosystem challenges.

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NI 529 - The biodiversity emergency - January, 2021
Machiguenga children at play in Manu’s spectacular wilderness, while their pet spider monkey explores a tree.Photo: Charlie James/National Geographic/Alamy

The limits of Eden

Peru’s Manu National Park is a biodiversity success story. But its management has left its ancestral peoples without voice and agency. Could that be about to change? asks Jack Lo Lau.

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NI 529 - The biodiversity emergency - January, 2021
Tourists and photographers zoom in on wildlife at the Mara river during the great wildebeest migration, Maasai Mara National Reserve, Kenya.Photo: Eric Baccega/Alamy

Beyond the tourist trail

Graeme Green speaks with local experts about why wildlife protection in Africa and Asia must push beyond relying on international visitors and foreign professionals towards sustainable, locally led initiatives.

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NI 529 - The biodiversity emergency - January, 2021
Photo: USGS/Unsplash

Why I matter

Seirian Sumner gives voice to a creature of amazing ecological value that humans usually consider a pest and the stinging scourge of summer picnics.

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NI 529 - The biodiversity emergency - January, 2021

Articles in this category displayed as a table:

Article title From magazine Publication date
Democracy on the edge March, 2021
Democracy on the edge March, 2021
Democracy on the edge March, 2021
Democracy on the edge March, 2021
Democracy on the edge March, 2021
Democracy on the edge March, 2021
Democracy on the edge March, 2021
Democracy on the edge March, 2021
Democracy on the edge March, 2021
Democracy on the edge March, 2021
The biodiversity emergency January, 2021
The biodiversity emergency January, 2021
The biodiversity emergency January, 2021
The biodiversity emergency January, 2021
The biodiversity emergency January, 2021
The biodiversity emergency January, 2021
The biodiversity emergency January, 2021
The biodiversity emergency January, 2021
The biodiversity emergency January, 2021
The biodiversity emergency January, 2021
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