Men from Baseco, a slum in the port area of Manila, the Philippines, show their scars from kidney sales in a photograph from 1999. Photo: Pat Roque/AP/Press Association Images

Perpetual scars

A forensic examination of the persistent problem of trafficking vulnerable people for their organs, and what it would take to stamp it out, by Nancy Scheper-Hughes.

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NI 472 - Organ trafficking - May, 2014
Commodities and dependency - The Facts

Commodities and dependency - The Facts

The facts and figures of commodities and our dependence on them.

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NI 470 - Commodities - the pitfalls of resource wealth - March, 2014
Demonstrators jostle in the streets of Rangoon, Burma, to protest the expansion of the Chinese-backed Latpadaung copper mine in the country’s northwest province. Thousands of hectares of farmland have been expropriated by the company and hundreds of villagers forced from their homes.Photo: EPA/Alamy

The pitfalls of resource wealth

Natural resource wealth isn't always a blessing. As Wayne Ellwood discovers, sometimes it can be just the opposite.

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NI 470 - Commodities - the pitfalls of resource wealth - March, 2014
How Somalia's coastal communities called time on the pirates

How Somalia's coastal communities called time on the pirates

Diaspora uncles and 'fathers against pirates' were as decisive as the frigates in ending the piracy scourge. Jamal Osman speaks to Hazel Healy.

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NI 465 - How the war on pirates became big business - September, 2013
Pirates’ victims are overwhelmingly seafarers from poor nations. Above, Vietnamese sailor Vu Van Ba is reunited with his parents after 18 months held hostage off the coast of Somalia.Ngyuen Huy Khan/Reuters

In the firing line

Piracy is just one in a long list of problems facing seafarers in a cut-throat shipping industry, reports Olivia Swift.

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NI 465 - How the war on pirates became big business - September, 2013
Pirate patrol: German troops in Djibouti prepare to join Europe’s anti-piracy mission in the Gulf of Aden, off Somalia.  The fight against pirates has been a handy way for countries like Germany and Japan to shrug off postwar constitutional constraints.Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters

Empire strikes back - where counter-piracy is going wrong

Pirate hijackings off the coast of Africa have spawned a lucrative protection industry. With private security guards taking to the oceans in ever increasing numbers, Hazel Healy asks whether this is really the way to ‘safer seas’.

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NI 465 - How the war on pirates became big business - September, 2013
Obama’s ‘free trade’ voyages are another big mistake labornotes

Obama’s ‘free trade’ voyages are another big mistake

New agreements that enhance corporate power are bad news, writes Mark Engler.

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NI 464 - Debt - a global scam - July, 2013
Demonstrators get straight to the point in September this year, when protesting against the Defence & Security Equipment International arms fair that drew 1,300 arms companies to London this year to hawk their wares to buying delegations from around the world. sinister pictures/Demotix/Demotix/Press Association Images

The clout of the arms industry

The arms trade tends to have the government's ear. Why, wonders Dinyar Godrej, when it is so counter-productive?

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NI 448 - The arms trade - December, 2011
The shadow world: corruption in the arms trade Illustration by Andrew Chiu

The shadow world: corruption in the arms trade

Andrew Feinstein examines the corrupt networks of arms deals.

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NI 448 - The arms trade - December, 2011
A Somali man carries food from the World Food Programme distribution centre at a refugee camp near the Kenya-Somalia border, August 2011.Thomas Mukoya / Reuters

Should foreign investment replace aid for Africa?

Donu Kogbara and Dereje Alemayehu go head to head - join the debate in this month's Argument.

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NI 445 - Pakistan - daring to hope - September, 2011
'Masses everywhere' celebrate a strike against low wages at the Chinese-owned Pine Great Cambodia Garment Company in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, September 2010.Chor Sokunthea / Reuters

The Great Rebellion

The Great Recession may have stunned the Minority World, but the Majority World has survived more or less unscathed. David Ransom investigates why, and traces the outlines of a future that might just be worth having.

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NI 440 - Up in arms - March, 2011
Stop the tar sands trade talks

Stop the tar sands trade talks

A protest against opening the EU's doors to Canada's polluting tar sands

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NI 440 - Up in arms - March, 2011

Articles in this category displayed as a table:

Article title From magazine Publication date
Organ trafficking May, 2014
Commodities - the pitfalls of resource wealth March, 2014
Commodities - the pitfalls of resource wealth March, 2014
Commodities - the pitfalls of resource wealth March, 2014
How the war on pirates became big business September, 2013
How the war on pirates became big business September, 2013
How the war on pirates became big business September, 2013
Debt - a global scam July, 2013
The arms trade December, 2011
The arms trade December, 2011
Pakistan - daring to hope September, 2011
Up in arms March, 2011
Up in arms March, 2011
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