Youth rising

A note from the editor

Jody McIntyre

Hip-hop artist Logic once rapped: ‘I get down for my people, down for my people, down with the government until we’re all equal!’ When I looked into the eyes of Logic’s first baby daughter, born a few weeks back, it seemed like a long time since we sat down to write those lyrics. It was before the police pulled me out of my wheelchair on a demonstration, when Hosni Mubarak was still chilling, before the London riots.

I struggle to imagine how the world must look through a baby’s eyes. But when I see them smile, I know that however much destruction we cause, the generations that follow will continue to struggle to make things better.This issue celebrates youth movements working to do exactly that. Far from being apathetic, young people are challenging an unjust world and have the idealism and energy to change things.

In this month’s Big Story, Farah Jassat challenges preconceptions, asking why certain schools of feminist thought are ignored by the mainstream media. Laurie Penny stokes up outrage with her lowdown on how youth in the West are shouldering the burden of a broken economic model.

We take a look at the techniques of the uncompromising Chilean student movement and listen to the frustrations of youth activists in occupied Palestine.

The cover image is by Andre Anderson, age 20, whom we found thanks to LIVE magazine (run by 15-24 year olds) in Brixton, London. It was the first-ever publication I wrote for, at the tender age of 15.

Inspired by LIVE’s principles of being written for young people, by young people, this month’s Big Story is written almost wholly by under 25s, with the exception of music makers Akala and Seun Kuti (both 28). The next generation will inherit the planet we reside in. Who better to lead the struggle?

Also this month, Australian journalist Ollie Milman writes of the disgraceful way his country treats child asylum-seekers; and regular contributor Stephanie Boyd visits Guatemala, where indigenous groups are leading the fight against Canada’s Goldcorp goldmining corporation.

Jody McIntyre for the New Internationalist co-operative.
www.newint.org

Keynote article.

Why selling out is no longer an option

Why selling out is no longer an option

Capitalism’s betrayals will cost youth dear. Laurie Penny’s call to arms.

Buy this magazine

People have started asking me and my friends when we’re going to sell out, move on and get real jobs, like they did after the Sixties. We are told that pretty soon, we’ll need to face reality.

Whenever anyone tells you that, it’s important to remember that the so-called ‘reality’ that we’re being ordered to face, in the way that one might be told to face the wall, was and is built on debt and sand: it is a specific agenda whose survival depends on everyone else continuing to believe that ...




Features.

Youth rising

Youth rising

Young people are playing a vital role in a sweeping wave of dissent, says Jody McIntyre.

Buy this magazine

Youth – The FACTS

This infographic takes a closer look at the contrasting lives of the 1.2 billion young people aged 15-24 worldwide.

Buy this magazine

When Akala met Seun

When Akala met Seun

Afrobeat star Seun Kuti talks to rapper Akala about hope, politics and African religions.

Buy this magazine

Palestine: shaking up the occupiers

Palestine: shaking up the occupiers

Linah Alsaafin voices youth frustration with the double bind of Israeli occupation and defunct Palestinian leadership.

Buy this magazine

Blog.

Tax justice podcast: the pin-stripe mafia

Tax justice podcast: the pin-stripe mafia

Switzerland, Bangladesh and the Big Four accountancy firms are featured in the latest Tax Justice Network podcast.

Read this article

Read more blogs...

Opinion.

A froth-free latte stirred with politics

A froth-free latte stirred with politics

A new leftwing café gives Steve Parry a break from empty consumerism and massive cups.

Buy this magazine

Is China good for Africa?

Writer and activist Firoze Manji and professor Stephen Chan go head-to-head.

Buy this magazine

Agenda.

British lawyers on the hunt for Mau Mau fighters in Kenya

British lawyers on the hunt for Mau Mau fighters in Kenya

Maina Waruru questions the motivations of firms seeking compensation from the British government.

Buy this magazine

Orange squash: foul play in Ukraine

Orange squash: foul play in Ukraine

Tina Burrett fears the 28 October elections will be neither free or fair.

Buy this magazine

Back