Populism rises again

A note from the editor

Dinyar Godrej

It’s crunch time! Final chance to join us

On 1 March we pushed the button and held our breath.

We had just launched our Community Share Offer inviting you, our readers and supporters, to buy into a better story and become co-owners of New Internationalist. Despite all the groundwork and detailed planning, we had shot off into uncharted territory.

I can at least reveal that we are breathing again. Your response has been immediate, tremendous and humbling. Within the first few days we reached a quarter of our target. The amazing messages you sent us (see Letters) have made us feel that you know us better than we know ourselves. On behalf of the entire NI co-operative – Thank You and Welcome.

I wish I could tell you we have landed safely – but as I write there is still a way to go. The share offer runs until 6 April at factsandheart.org. Our target of £500,000 is all-or-nothing – if we don’t reach it, we won’t draw down a penny. To invest, go online at factsandheart.org, or call us on +44 (0)1865 413304 (UK) or (613) 826 1319 (US and Canada).

The coming weeks will be critical. In that time, for want of a working crystal ball, we will be doing our damnedest to reach all the like-minded people we possibly can to make this happen. Please help spread the word.

Many of our new owners have been telling us how, in a landscape of media distortion, fake news and alternative facts, you appreciate what we have to offer. Coincidentally, this wonky landscape is the setting for this month’s Big Story, which examines the frightening rise of rightwing populism. As always, we also consider the possible remedies.

Dinyar Godrej for the New Internationalist co-operative.
www.newint.org

Keynote article.

Paroxysm: Robin Roy, a fervent Donald Trump supporter, eyeballs her idol. 
This image was clicked during Trump’s presidential campaign, but Roy’s enthusiasm has not wavered now that he holds office.

Paroxysm: Robin Roy, a fervent Donald Trump supporter, eyeballs her idol.
This image was clicked during Trump’s presidential campaign, but Roy’s enthusiasm has not wavered now that he holds office.

Photo: Brian Snyder/Reuters

The will of the people

Hardliners are thriving on popular disenchantment with politics. Dinyar Godrej on the challenge they pose.

Buy this magazine

I have to be honest. My first reaction is usually groaning disbelief.

As I write it’s the run-up to the general elections in the Netherlands where I live and a certain bleached blond bombshell is impossible to avoid because he has led the polls for much of it.1

Geert Wilders, the leader of the Freedom Party (PVV), is an autocratic one-man show – he is the party’s only member. His party manifesto displays the brevity of a Twitter habitué. N...




Features.

Stormy, vibrant, paradoxical times

As the New Internationalist embarks on its great, democratic, community shares experiment, Vanessa Baird explores the contradictions of today’s media landscape.

Buy this magazine

Is democracy in danger?

Rising distrust of politicians and parliaments, declining voter turnouts – these are now common trends in many established democracies. But is support for democracy itself ebbing away?

Buy this magazine

Whose truth is it anyway?

Swallowing the lies – or ‘alternative facts’ – of populist politicians is having profound consequences. NJ Enfield takes a fresh look at a potent old tradition – and suggests a way forward.

Buy this magazine

International solidarity: Donald Trump’s inauguration on 20 January saw protests across the world – even in Antarctica. This image comes from a demonstration outside the US embassy in London.

The Establishment is not a viable candidate

The Trump shock shows that the same old same old is no longer an option. Jonathan Matthew Smucker on building the progressive alternative.

Buy this magazine

Fond hopes that die: Angelo Lafuente’s mother visits his grave. His body, riddled with bullets and covered in torture marks, was found by a filthy river that feeds into the Manila bay. She blames the police for his death.

Mr Tough

The violence of the Duterte regime in the Philippines and the devotion of his fans, as witnessed by Iris C Gonzales.

Buy this magazine

The populist moment

Don’t just think of it as a dirty word, says Richard Swift; a genuine populism of the Left is long overdue.

Buy this magazine

It may be cold outside, but the welcome is warm: Ann and Nick (left) with the Al Khatoufs.

A personal welcome

In Canada, private sponsors are paying refugees’ resettlement costs. But should such a scheme be replicated elsewhere? Sian Griffiths reports.

Buy this magazine

Traditional roles: girls in Mozambique are taught from a young age to be housewives. But some young women are finding the strength to forge their own paths.

A second chance

Rebecca Cooke meets young women in Mozambique who are defying the odds and resisting child marriage.

Buy this magazine

Surrogates in India, such as this woman, carrying a child for a couple in the US, earned around $6,000 for each pregnancy until the government banned it in August 2016.

Global babies: who benefits?

Surrogacy has become an international trade that needs tighter regulation, argues Miranda Davies.

Buy this magazine

Blog.

Flowers are placed at the scene of an attack on Westminster Bridge, in London, Britain, on 24 March 2017.

The hate that divides us

In shock after hearing of the London attack and a Bangalore assault, Mari Marcel Thekaekara reflects on what could defeat hate of the ‘other’ and finally bring us together.

Read this article

Read more blogs...

Opinion.

An activist protests in front of the US-Mexican border fence.

When sanctuary is resistance

In the United States in the 1980s, the simple act of providing refuge became a form of civil disobedience, writes Mark Engler.

Buy this magazine

The laws won’t work.

There is no country in the world that has a proud history of men making great laws about women’s bodies, writes Kate Smurthwaite.

Buy this magazine

Agenda.

Under threat: fertile valleys in the Sahara face mining pollution.

Water protectors promote democracy in Morocco

As excessive extraction makes water a scarce resource, the struggle of Imidir can give a glimpse into a future where the choice must be made between industry and community, writes Kevin Buckland.

Buy this magazine

No cash, little hope for India's poor

No cash, little hope for India's poor

Many are finding it impossible to pay school fees for their malnourished children or to get medicines for ailing family members, writes Dilnaz Boga.

Buy this magazine

The ugly face of Benetton

The forcible expulsion of the Mapuche from land that now turns a profit for Benetton dates back to colonization, write Leny Olivera and Sian Cowman.

Buy this magazine

Introducing Adama Barrow

The new president of the Gambia promises to revive the economy, to end censorship of the media, and to leave after three years, writes Richard Swift.

Buy this magazine

Sudan targets Darfuri students

Sudan targets Darfuri students

Amnesty Interantional states that at least 10,000 Darfuri students have been arbitrarily arrested or detained since 2003, writes Maina Waruru.

Buy this magazine

Flamingos under fire in Iraq

In the absence of deterrent laws or decisive action by the authorities, hunters are killing the migrant birds on a large scale, reports Robert Ewan.

Buy this magazine

Challenging deportation in Britain

There have been reports of violence and mistreatment of detainees on board charter flights, and campaigners report inadequate independent monitoring, reports Amy Hall.

Buy this magazine

Murders most foul in Mexico

Murders most foul in Mexico

Systematic murders of activists, particularly environmentalists, often fly under the radar, says Richard Swift.

Buy this magazine

March for Aleppo

March for Aleppo

Citizens from across Europe are retracing the footsteps of refugees by walking from Germany to Syria, writes Lydia Noon.

Buy this magazine

Reasons to be cheerful

Bhutan goes negative; Pakistan’s trans rights; United communities

Buy this magazine

Regulars.

Letters

Praise, blame and all points in between? Your feedback published in the April 2017 magazine.

Read this article

Standstill - Letter from Cochabamba

Her travel plans thwarted, Amy Booth reflects on a very Bolivian way of drawing attention to grievances.

Buy this magazine

Clockwise from top left: A cycle rickshaw loaded with tyres negotiates traffic in the capital, Phnom Penh; selling lotus flowers, the seeds of which are edible, at the roadside; a typical village on stilts at the edge of the Tonle Sap river; monks and sightseers, also beside the Tonle Sap river; and carrying water in a slum settlement on the outskirts of the capital, with a floating casino on the Mekong river behind.

Country Profile: Cambodia

Both cash flow and political power have remained concentrated in Cambodia, writes Zoe Holman.

Buy this magazine

Open Window

Pedro X Molina from Nicaragua with ‘American Honeymoon’.

Buy this magazine

P Sainath's people's archive of rural India

The journalist talks to Charukesi Ramadurai about recording the stories of everyday people and his hopes for India’s future.

Buy this magazine

Film, Book & Music Reviews.

Amazing Amazons, tackling FGM and other abuses

Mixed media: music reviews

A Common Truth by Satland; Les Amazones d’Afrique by République Amazone.

Buy this magazine

Mixed media: book reviews

They Can't Kill Us All; Romaphodia; Familiar Strangers

Buy this magazine

Back